A Travellerspoint blog

Happy Birthday to You-ganda!

54 years old as a nation and what really is independence anyway?

sunny 32 °C

Ugandan Independence Day 1962

Ugandan Independence Day 1962

Uganda as a nation is only 54 years old, celebrating its birthday on Independence day on October 9th*. The British administration handed over the running of the Ugandan people to the Ugandan government in 1962. 'Uhuru' (Swahili for freedom) here is a national holiday celebrated through marches, brass bands and choirs. Uhuru is one of the few days where some people will eat meat like chicken or goat.
Ugandan baby at the celebrations

Ugandan baby at the celebrations

Marches on the football field

Marches on the football field


We went round to our friends Richard and Eunice to eat beef, rice, cabbage and 'enyasa', the Lugbara staple made from cassava flour. (Lugbaras say that if you haven't eaten enyasa, you've haven't had anything to eat'). It was special to spend the day with some Ugandan friends.
Celebrating Ugandan Independence Day with Friends

Celebrating Ugandan Independence Day with Friends


Being Scottish, the concept of 'Independence' always makes me think deeply... and it is also a very current concept following the UK's Brexit vote.

One Ugandan friend called Stephen, one of the brightest people I know in Arua, told me he thinks that the British should still rule Uganda as it would be better off and more organised. When the British handed Uganda over, the country had a similar level of development as Singapore, South Korea and Malaysia. Since, then, however, Uganda has struggled developmentally. Currently, it sits as one of the poorest countries globally. It's Human Development Index rank, which measures health, education and standard of living, is 163 compared to Singapore's rank of 11th, South Korea's 17th position and Malaysia at 62. As such, in Uganda, many aspects of life can be a slog.

However, although the African borders are mainly a European construct, very few would say Uganda or another African nation should not be independent, despite hardships. Independence is something that is celebrated and highly prized. However, the problems Uganda has faced since Independence does pose questions as to what 'freedom' should actually look like. Is national freedom but high infant mortality rate a good trade-off? In any case, what does independence look like in a globalised world, is it 'real'?

Additionally, with 52 tribal groups in Uganda bunched together as one nation, how do each of these tribal groups consider their self-expression? Historically, the dominant Buganda people have vied for more power. Today, Uganda is in the international news because armed guards of Rwenzururu kingdom were bloodily subdued recently. The King was supposedly agitating for the creation of a separate state straddling Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. What does independence as part of a bigger 'nation' mean for these smaller, historically independent people groups?

Ugandan Independence day makes me consider what real human freedom really means. One of my heroes, Nelson Mandela, is a poignant example of how despite his imprisonment, he remained a 'free' person. He stayed free in his mind despite his circumstances. In prison, he earned a bachelor of law degree from the University of London and became a leader for fellow- prisoners. That is pretty impressive.

Conversely, the physical freedom we prize so highly in the West can often trap us. When I worked for Bethany Christian Trust in the drug and alcohol rehab, one of the things I was told was that the UK is an addictive society. We are shopaholics, workaholics, sex addicts, drug addicts, food addicts, image addicts. This seems to be getting worse with the advent of social media. We are facing a 'loneliness epidemic', a growth in depression and social breakdown. We get trapped doing the very things that are supposed to give us freedom. It doesn't often seem that our 'freedom' makes us happy. Instead, much of what we do has the potential to imprison us.
Loneliness

Loneliness


Ugandan independence is important, but there are other issues which are needed for real freedom. In Uganda, many people may still be imprisoned in terrible material poverty whereas materialism might be the problem in the UK.

Real freedom comes from something much different. I feel I have experienced what Jesus said "If the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed". Addicts I worked with in the rehab I already mentioned, for example, have seen their lives completely changed because of their faith in God.

What I hope for, and work for in Uganda through Lifestitches or Life-skills training at YWAM is for people to know their worth, to reach their potential and to be liberated in their mind and heart whatever circumstances they find themselves in.

*This blog was meant to be posted much earlier!

Posted by africraigs 11:41 Archived in Uganda Comments (4)

Blessed are the poor...

semi-overcast

Since coming back from the UK at the end of July, I (David) have been much more involved with Lifestitches, a project that helps economically empower and provide practical skills to mothers who are unfortunate enough to be living with HIV. The Lifestitches project began in 2001 when a pediatric doctor from the States got involved supporting a group of HIV+ mothers who met under a mango tree at the Arua government hospital.
Mothers learn how to sew through the Lifestitches programme

Mothers learn how to sew through the Lifestitches programme


The ladies have many tragic stories. One of the Lifestitches’ ladies called Angela, is a 45-year old woman. Through the project, she hopes to set up as a tailor in her village, which she believes will allow her to earn a small income to help her with basic needs at home like buying food for some of her 10 children still living with her. She had 15, but 5 others died. 4 of the kids are in school, although she never made it to school herself, so at Lifestitches, she is also learning to write her name in the dirt under the shade of a mango tree.
Angela

Angela

Angela write her name under the mango tree

Angela write her name under the mango tree


Culturally, Lugbara girls can marry early and Angela was around 13 when she married her husband. Her husband is now dead after contracting HIV/AIDS, most likely picked up when he was in the capital, Kampala for long periods earning some money by doing manual labour. Although the husband and his relatives knew he was HIV+, it was never mentioned to Angela herself until after her husband died. She was angry at her husband, but could do nothing about it since he had already died having passed on his illness to her.

Thankfully, Lifestitches is providing some hope and support for Angela in the struggle of daily life, but sadly, this is only one of the many stories of unjust and unnecessary suffering surrounding us.

However, for Angela and so many others like her, the spiritual realm is a crucial component that gives them hope and thankfully so. Many of the mothers are Catholic and wear long beaded chains with a metal or plastic cross hanging on their chests.

In the African mindset, there is no discussion that there is a spiritual dimension to life. In Uganda, 85% of the population claim to be Christian and there are high proportions of believers all over sub-Saharan Africa. I have heard people say that “If God is not real, we have nothing”. Belief provides hope and an explanation for the incomprehensible.

I have only ever met one atheist in Africa…when I was buying a Bible in a bookstore in Kenya! The spiritual realm is very real to Africans and is intimately connected with everyday life. In the African Traditional Religion, which is still important within the culture, spirits inhabit nature and especially lakes and forests. Witchdoctors are still visited for healing. Curses cause sickness and death. Every death has a spiritual explanation and physical life whether it is the rainfall or an accident is connected with what happens in the spirit-world.

The Bible says that it is more difficult for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich person to know God. Unlike in Africa, in the West, our ‘stuff’ gets in the way of our spirituality. It seems that because we have all that we need and so much more, we don’t think we need God or anyone else, for that matter. We can solve all our problems using our own ingenuity, creativity and intelligence. We don’t need to believe in a higher power having an influence and impacting our lives in the here and now.

One danger in this (non)-belief comes across in pride and all the too common judgemental attitude we have in the West towards Africa which suggests that Africans must be less developed (an attitude which I am not immune too as well). The narrative is that as more people are educated and learn modern ways, religion will become less important. 'Religion is the opiate for the (uneducated) masses'. However, despite the 'advanced' state of the 'developed' nations, there is increasing moral confusion in the West, the increasing problems of depression and loneliness, environmental problems, addictions, relationship breakdown and social problems.
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Despite her simplicity, or because of it, unschooled Angela challenges our educated beliefs. She challenges us through her dignified suffering despite the incredible difficulties of her life. She challenges me specifically because despite all my ‘stuff’ to help me enjoy life and be comfortable, she has learned secrets to dealing with difficulties that I will never comprehend. She can cope with whatever life throws at her. People get on with their lives, continuing with smiles on their faces and the infectious ability to laugh easily. In the West, where we may need counseling because our pet dog has died, Africans have a depth and strength that I can only dream of having. If that is what Angela's spiritual nature gives her, we have a lot of catching up to do in the West.

For a daily update on what we are up to, follow us @africraigs
E-mail us: africraigs@gmail.com

Posted by africraigs 02:55 Archived in Uganda Comments (1)

Arran James Carlton Craig!

Our newest family addition!

overcast 14 °C

It's been so long since blogging, I feel a bit out of the loop, combined with any inspiration and creativity which seem to have temporarily gone on holiday (along with patience)..
I'm writing this in the newborn fog, where night time hours blur, and daytime hours seem in a weird slow motion, and the to-do list changes from 10 things to get done to 2, which give immense pride if completed...

We are delighted that Arran James Carlton Craig made his arrival a week early at 2.33am on 12th May, in a birth centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, weighing in at 7.7lbs or 3.3 kgs. Without going into the gory details, it was the most straight-forward of the three deliveries, and the dimly lit, calm birthing suite (equipped with birthing pool, en-suite and flatscreen TV) and matter-of- fact, sensible midwife, was a far cry from 5 years ago in Kenya giving birth to Amelie!
Amelie and Kenyan midwife

Amelie and Kenyan midwife

I'll take the liberty of using my post-birth hormones as a scapegoat, but being back in the newborn zone has made me feel quite nostalgic, as memories come flooding back about Amelie and Asher's births, one in Kenya, one in England..

Amelie

Amelie


Asher

Asher


Meeting Asher in Reading 2013

Meeting Asher in Reading 2013


Arran

Arran

and the reminder of how much the UK offers in terms of healthcare, freebies, aftercare, and what a privilege it was to extend our Home Assignment time in order to benefit from the healthcare system, and a wonderful support network here. I think about our Ugandan friends who are expecting babies at the moment, and feel a wave of fear thinking about their upcoming delivery and recovery and the need to pray for them, when the facts and figures of child and mother mortality are shocking and real, and are the names of people we've known.

We feel quite indebted to friends and family who have shown such kindness and generosity, and made the 'early blur' so much clearer than it could have been.

The other thing I've felt nostalgic about recently is thinking about my big brother Ian, whose anniversary of his tragic climbing accident was just a couple of days after Arran's birth. When you look at a scrunched up tiny newborn who literally just eats, sleeps and poops, it is hard to imagine and remember that they are a bundle of potential, to change their world, to make a difference, to make good/ bad choices, to influence others and stand up for their convictions. Ian was a remarkable person who never felt the need to comply with what society expected of him, and in his quirky, sometimes awkward manner, shone brightly wherever he was with his balding head and big smile and awful dress sense.

2 baldies! Ian, David and a friend Mike back in 2006..

2 baldies! Ian, David and a friend Mike back in 2006..

Arran is named after the Scottish island of Arran; meaning 'strong'

James is David's great-grandfather's name and has strong family connections

and Carlton is David's Jamaican Grandpa's name- he turns 91 today, and has been another inspiring person who has gone against the odds throughout his life, coming from a background of slavery to make his mark on the Scottish education system as the first black headteacher, and it
seems fitting that Carlton means Freedom

Great Grandpa Carlton amidst the commotion

Great Grandpa Carlton amidst the commotion

So, for scrunched up, little sleeping Arran, our hope and prayer is that he will remain strong to his convictions, and find freedom in following God's ways, and stand up for those who are oppressed, fight for their freedom, and make his mark on the world.

Amelie and Asher are thrilled with their 'live dolly', and the novelty of Arran's slightly boring schedule hasn't worn off yet..

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I am looking forward to all being settled in our home in Uganda in a couple of months time, but the thought of all the goodbyes, especially after this extra time to reconnect with people, is a hard and emotional thought, and the thought of packing and stocking up for the next couple of years in Uganda is something my mind can barely comprehend in the season of fog..

so for now, I'll take today as it comes, and try to get through the embarrassingly short 'to-do' list...

Lots of love, xxxxx

First family pic as 5 in the Birthing Suite!

First family pic as 5 in the Birthing Suite!

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Posted by africraigs 02:04 Archived in Scotland Comments (2)

'Do you speak African..?'

and other specialities of Home Assignment...

rain 13 °C

We've been on our UK Home Assignment for a good 2 months now, (and yes, it's been a pretty good 2 months, thanks). After the excitement of my sister's Reading Wedding, sleeping in various beds, numerous visits, hunting for items like socks and hair mousse as we pack and re-pack… we are very pleased to settle into a lovely flat (way too lovely, and dangerously cream-coloured for toddlers!). It is a flat in a nice part of Edinburgh, very kindly sorted out by someone in the church...

and life almost feels normal.

Almost.

But then there are a few things which still make us very excited (or just put us in a good mood)... like...

1. for us all to be anonymous, not people to be stared at, not a 'mzungu' or a 'mundu', but instead to blend in and feel like a fairly normal, frizzy- haired family
2. not needing to use complex maths skills to convert pounds or dollars into thousands and millions of Ugandan shillings
3. drinkable tap water and instant hot water!
4. the NHS, NHS 24, check ups, tests and caring Doctors
5. home-baking (there is an obvious downside to this), fresh milk and reasonably priced, non- stale cereal.. the kids could glug milk till the cows come home…and keep asking for more bowls of cereal.
6. thought- provoking, good, meaty sermons... WHILST the kids are being safely entertained in creche or Sunday school
7. the choice and variety in supermarkets
8. TV... it has been a treat to enjoy Downton Abbey, Bake-Off, Match of the Day and CBeebies
9. and of course it sounds clichéd, but The People... it has been so encouraging to see childhood friends, old school friends, friends from summer mission trips, church friends, work friends, uni pals, brother, sisters, and for our kids to meet and play with their cousins, aunties, uncles, grandparents and great grandparents. My parents have lost several of their good friends this year, and it has been a sobering reminder of the fragility of life, and the need to cherish special times together and take lots of photos, and (most of the time!) it feels like a privilege to have these few intense people-packed months...

However, to give a more balanced picture of Home Assignment, it's not been all cheesy photos and tray bakes…

1. Kids and long car journeys are not a particularly fun combination
2. Kids and lack of routine= another lousy combo. I especially think it must be very confusing for little Asher who has no idea where he being taken to or who he is visiting. He sometimes seems to think he is in Arua...
3. Being in a hospitable culture where cake and/ or biscuits are automatically brought out with a hot drink is tempting at the best of times... which can be problematic when we are visiting people...a lot…we might need to check the extra baggage allowance on the return flights (!) and prepare ourselves for the blunt Ugandan response 'eh, you are now very fat'.. We have missed foods like 'Tunnocks teacakes' or caramel shortcakes so it’s time to catch up! :-)
4. Our nearly-5 year old is missing her friends in Uganda, and if we properly lived in the UK, would have just started school, which I'm sure she would be enjoying and seems ready for… so attempting to home school in this short season is not the easiest role
5. Trying to explain such a different life back in Uganda to people can be difficult, especially when asked questions like 'do you speak African?'..

6. Although it is lovely to be back in the UK for this visit, we are definitely not settled here, with the normal rhythms and roots of work, school etc, and it can sometime feel like living in a parallel life to ‘normal’ people.

That all said... I'm sure in a few years time when we have moved back to the UK permanently, and will have the alarm clock, school run, swimming lessons and juggling childcare with work, there will be fleeting moments when we look longingly back on this season of time; the season when water and milk are still a novelty, and where we are relatively free to meet up with friends at the drop of a hat… :-)

Zoe and Jamie's Reading Wedding...

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DSC_0027

burnell clan

burnell clan

running wild at the Reading wedding

running wild at the Reading wedding

wedding poppets

wedding poppets

Catching up with friends

Asher happily surrounded by sweet girls

Asher happily surrounded by sweet girls

3 yearly catch up with old friends

3 yearly catch up with old friends

beach and rockpools

beach and rockpools

time with the great grandies

time with the great grandies

childhood friend

childhood friend

mission trip friends

mission trip friends


Enjoying Edinburgh and different seasons..

enjoying autumn

enjoying autumn

Amelie's first summit! Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh

Amelie's first summit! Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh

Posted by africraigs 12:38 Archived in Scotland Comments (0)

treading water & feeling a bit out of the loop..

(First week back in the UK)

overcast 14 °C

We’ve been back in the UK a week

.. and already ticked- off some of the essentials; deep, hot bubble baths, play parks, my sister’s hen do, bridesmaid dress fittings, cheese, wine and nice brown bread consumed. David says that coming back on 'Home Assignment' is like getting a vehicle MOT since there is the dentist to visit, a de-brief planned, doctor's appointments and even physio to get done.

Beautiful Turkey

Beautiful Turkey


Turkey

Turkey

Last week on our delightful (!) Turkish holiday en-route to the UK, Amelie learned to swim. Turkey was a great stop-over for a rest after the intensity of Uganda but before the appointments and catch-ups of the UK. There was a pool next to the apartment, which meant we were in the water every day, and one day she saw a 3-year old jump in and swim, that was it… Armbands were off and replaced with a feisty determination. It was a bit daunting to watch as she frantically doggy-paddled through the water, her face mainly under the water, and the visible relief as the felt the security of the wall.

Proud swimmer

Proud swimmer

Coming back to the UK this time round has felt a bit like Amelie’s swimming- I feel and probably look like I’m flailing and drowning, but hope and trust I am slowly getting to the other side.

It’s not that anything is massively different or difficult than what we remember, but it is the seemingly inconsequential things that I need to consciously remember again; like how the ticketing queuing system works to buy kids shoes in a crowded shoe shop just before term starts, or how to drive in a polite British manner, observing the rules not the assertive Ugandan way, not needing to greet people, nor say ‘sorry sorry sorry’ if someone drops something, and realising that I urgently need to get a phone, as phonebooths seem to be a dying a death...

So many things seem to jump out everywhere that just seem so different to the 'normal' we’re now used to…

  • Charity shops- after several months of clearing out and de-cluttering our home in Uganda, and even the tattiest/ broken item being taken and used by someone, poor David was in for an embarrassing shock when he and the kids struggled to the local OXFAM with bags of stuff from me and my almost-married sister.. an old lady grumbled that they didn’t need or want anymore products and he should take it elsewhere. A more sympathetic lady saw David’s face, the over-laden buggy and the whining munchkins and took the bags from him. To David’s mortification, he heard the less sympathetic lady mutter ‘I wish you’d told that man to take his bags, it’s a load of junk, I’ll have to give my hands a good wash now…’
  • Garden Centres- places where plants and tools are for beauty and enjoyment rather than just for survival.
  • Fathers attentively playing and tending to their babies.
  • Middle- aged couples holding hands.
  • Having gluten free’ snack options for kids in the church crèche.
  • Having child protection policies, ratios, training for volunteers, lesson plans even for Sunday school teachers.
  • Not needing mozzie nets nor worrying about a life -threatening illness when the kids have a slight fever. Having the peace of mind of highly trained medical personnel close at hand in case anything goes wrong anyway...
  • Drinking from the tap!
  • Trying to get rid of small change rather than trying to accumulate it.

We are staying with my parents for the next few weeks and we were amazed at the polite letter from the council warning they would be doing roadworks for the next few days and were very sorry for the disruption. After spending the last year with the dirt roads all over Arua being dug up by huge Chinese trucks, mounds of mud being dumped on the road and diggers and rollers steaming towards me with no warnings, it all feels quite neat and organized.

It is good to be back in the UK, and of course so special to reconnect with family and friends over the next few weeks and to be here for all the
‘dynamics’ of the wedding prep, but it is also much more overwhelming than I expected, and so if you see me making awkward Uganglish cultural blunders and looking like I’m drowning, I probably feel like I am, so please help me out xxx

sisters

sisters


Most of my family together again

Most of my family together again


bake-off Hen soon to be MRS

bake-off Hen soon to be MRS

Posted by africraigs 23:47 Archived in England Tagged home family transition confusion support_network Comments (8)

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