A Travellerspoint blog

Jamaica

Living like Kings in Kingston

actually, Ocho Rios

semi-overcast 32 °C

I came to Jamaica to visit me roots. It was great to meet family while I was there. It was very confusing to figure out how we were related, I was wanting to draw a family tree and maybe I will still do that. We stayed with Hugh and Elaine Vaughan who is my grandpa's nephew and wife. They are the most hard-working people I have ever met - they got up at 3am 3x a week to go jogging 10km(even though they are over 60!). Hugh is an opthamologist -one of the top eye doctors in Jamaica and his wife works with him. Their son Bobby is an optician which complements his dad's work. The photo shows the family. I guess those early morning genes didn't get passed on to me.
Hugh Vaughan and family

Hugh Vaughan and family


One of the other family members - Ilsa (who is a 2nd cousin once removed or something weird like that) popped in to visit on the day we were leaving. She also brought her son and his wife and child. Ilsa has her own business and also seems very on the ball. Ilsa was very kind and was keen on showing us Kingston as we hadn't seen much (having been robbed at knife point on our last outing...). It was great to see a little of the town and get to go shopping, although it was slightly stressful watching the time tick away with our plane to catch. She told us a little about my grandpa's dad who was a part Indian and who loved gardening and was passionate about the environment. It was funny hearing that because grandpa loves the garden and plants and that is how I got into agriculture and the environment.
Aunt Ilsa duVerney and family

Aunt Ilsa duVerney and family


While we were at Hugh and Elaines, they very generously put us up a night in a hotel in Ocho Rios on the north coast of Jamaica where all the beautiful beaches are. All the food and drinks were included which is an amazing way to live I can tell you....! It was an idyllic place with the warm turquoise sea, white sandy beaches and sun. I guess a little bit like Portobello in the height of summer...? Emma was in her element bathing in the sun and swimming.
Swimming Pool Fun, Ocho Rio

Swimming Pool Fun, Ocho Rio


Hotel Riu

Hotel Riu


Sandy Beach, Ocho Rios

Sandy Beach, Ocho Rios

Posted by africraigs 19:32 Archived in Jamaica Tagged family_travel Comments (0)

Armed Robbery

(But that doesn’t change the price of fish…)

sunny 33 °C

Hey mon! We arrived in Jamaica on Thursday eve and were not allowed to go through immigration because David’s relatives address was not sufficient, so an announcement had to go out for Bim and Norma (the relies) to come to the information desk and give a more detailed address.
Norma and Bim

Norma and Bim


We got to their house safely and enjoyed a big bowl of chicken and pumpkin soup and dumplings.
Flower

Flower

Flower

Flower

Friday was a day of culture shock & confusion. David and I sat on the verandah for most of the day, reading and waiting and wondering what the ‘plan’ was for the day, and getting confusing responses.
Reading outside

Reading outside

Once again, my En Route course content has been apt- this week about culture shock and third culture kids… it describes culture shock as the confusion and disorientation in a different culture, and this has definitely summed up our feelings, wondering what the ‘right’ thing to do is, wondering what’s expected etc.

On Saturday we had loosely ‘planned’ to go around Kingston with Norma. This turned out to be one of the scariest experiences in a long time. We drove into Kingston city centre, and Norma pointed out various places. We drove down to the sea and past a big Jamaican bank and David and I got out to take photos. The street was empty, although there were security guards outside the bank. David went off to take a photo of graffiti and Norma got out of her car and told us to hurry as it wasn’t a good place to be loitering.

Norma and I walked back to the car and three boys, two 10 year olds and a taller boy walked towards us quickly and confidently. I saw a long machete by the side of one of the boys legs and was about to ask Norma whether this was normal, when the kids attacked Norma, knocked her to the ground, threatened her with the machete and ran off with her handbag. A really unexpected, frightening experience. Norma was lying on the ground, David heard me screaming and came racing back and began to chase the boys. The bank security guards rang the police.

We spent the next few hours in a police station, which was a cultural experience, if nothing else. A very large policeman, casually dressed in a tupac t- shirt and flip- flops, took our statements. He raised an eyebrow and looked at us both quizzically when Norma introduced me as her cousin...
''Cousins''

''Cousins''


Norma was quite remarkable, obviously shaken up and hurt, and upset to lose all her belongings, and yet her and the policeman would burst into laughter at various points in the interview, including when the detective asked her a question about her handbag and she responded with ‘well, that doesn’t change the price of a fish eh?’ (followed by laughter.) I hope some of her good attitude rubs off onto me.

Experiences like this give fresh appreciation to the value of feeling ‘safe’, and also bring fresh anxiety to living in Kenya next year.

Scene of the crime

Scene of the crime

Posted by africraigs 09:49 Archived in Jamaica Tagged family_travel Comments (0)

(Entries 1 - 2 of 2) Page [1]