A Travellerspoint blog

Armed Robbery

(But that doesn’t change the price of fish…)

sunny 33 °C

Hey mon! We arrived in Jamaica on Thursday eve and were not allowed to go through immigration because David’s relatives address was not sufficient, so an announcement had to go out for Bim and Norma (the relies) to come to the information desk and give a more detailed address.
Norma and Bim

Norma and Bim


We got to their house safely and enjoyed a big bowl of chicken and pumpkin soup and dumplings.
Flower

Flower

Flower

Flower

Friday was a day of culture shock & confusion. David and I sat on the verandah for most of the day, reading and waiting and wondering what the ‘plan’ was for the day, and getting confusing responses.
Reading outside

Reading outside

Once again, my En Route course content has been apt- this week about culture shock and third culture kids… it describes culture shock as the confusion and disorientation in a different culture, and this has definitely summed up our feelings, wondering what the ‘right’ thing to do is, wondering what’s expected etc.

On Saturday we had loosely ‘planned’ to go around Kingston with Norma. This turned out to be one of the scariest experiences in a long time. We drove into Kingston city centre, and Norma pointed out various places. We drove down to the sea and past a big Jamaican bank and David and I got out to take photos. The street was empty, although there were security guards outside the bank. David went off to take a photo of graffiti and Norma got out of her car and told us to hurry as it wasn’t a good place to be loitering.

Norma and I walked back to the car and three boys, two 10 year olds and a taller boy walked towards us quickly and confidently. I saw a long machete by the side of one of the boys legs and was about to ask Norma whether this was normal, when the kids attacked Norma, knocked her to the ground, threatened her with the machete and ran off with her handbag. A really unexpected, frightening experience. Norma was lying on the ground, David heard me screaming and came racing back and began to chase the boys. The bank security guards rang the police.

We spent the next few hours in a police station, which was a cultural experience, if nothing else. A very large policeman, casually dressed in a tupac t- shirt and flip- flops, took our statements. He raised an eyebrow and looked at us both quizzically when Norma introduced me as her cousin...
''Cousins''

''Cousins''


Norma was quite remarkable, obviously shaken up and hurt, and upset to lose all her belongings, and yet her and the policeman would burst into laughter at various points in the interview, including when the detective asked her a question about her handbag and she responded with ‘well, that doesn’t change the price of a fish eh?’ (followed by laughter.) I hope some of her good attitude rubs off onto me.

Experiences like this give fresh appreciation to the value of feeling ‘safe’, and also bring fresh anxiety to living in Kenya next year.

Scene of the crime

Scene of the crime

Posted by africraigs 09:49 Archived in Jamaica Tagged family_travel

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